How to Shape Gameplay for Swish, Jr.

Swish is a great game for encouraging both peer play and independent play in my students with autism. It requires visual perception, matching, & spatial reasoning skills. And the cards are very cool!

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How to Shape Gameplay for Swish, Jr.
11 Steps
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1
Place one card on the table. Hand the student a second card in the correct position for matching. Ask "Does it match?" or "Show me the match."

Place one card on the table. Hand the student a second card in the correct position for matching. Ask "Does it match?" or "Show me the match."

2
When the student has matched the card correctly three times consecutively, I then hand them a card that does NOT match. The student should be able to identify that it is not a correct match.

When the student has matched the card correctly three times consecutively, I then hand them a card that does NOT match. The student should be able to identify that it is not a correct match.

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3
Place one card on the table. Hand the student a second card in a position that requires the student to rotate it to make a match. Ask "Does it match" or "Show me the match."

Place one card on the table. Hand the student a second card in a position that requires the student to rotate it to make a match. Ask "Does it match" or "Show me the match."

4
When the student has matched cards by rotating them three consecutive times, I then hand them a card that does NOT match. The student should be able to identify that it is not a correct match.

When the student has matched cards by rotating them three consecutive times, I then hand them a card that does NOT match. The student should be able to identify that it is not a correct match.

5
Place one card on the table. Hand the student a second card in a position that requires them to turn the card over in order to make the match. Continue as described on previous steps.

Place one card on the table. Hand the student a second card in a position that requires them to turn the card over in order to make the match. Continue as described on previous steps.

6

Place one card on the table. Randomly rotate through matches and non-matches, and requiring the learner to rotate or turn over the card in order to make a match.

7
Place 3 cards on the table, with 2 of the 3 cards being a match. Instruct the learner to call out "Swish!" when he/she sees the match, pick up the match, then replace the 2 cards from a draw pile.

Place 3 cards on the table, with 2 of the 3 cards being a match. Instruct the learner to call out "Swish!" when he/she sees the match, pick up the match, then replace the 2 cards from a draw pile.

8
Same as step 7, but with 6 cards placed on the table. Some learners with autism will be able to start at this or later steps, but those who struggle with scanning will need to start at earlier steps.

Same as step 7, but with 6 cards placed on the table. Some learners with autism will be able to start at this or later steps, but those who struggle with scanning will need to start at earlier steps.

9
Same as step eight, but with nine cards placed on the table.

Same as step eight, but with nine cards placed on the table.

10
Same as step nine, but with twelve cards on the table. You're now playing the game as designed, and increasing opportunities for play with siblings and peers!

Same as step nine, but with twelve cards on the table. You're now playing the game as designed, and increasing opportunities for play with siblings and peers!

11
For more information on modifying games for learners with autism and other developmental delays, visit www.samblanco.com.

For more information on modifying games for learners with autism and other developmental delays, visit www.samblanco.com.

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