How to Pitch Fastpitch Softball

Of the four styles of pitching in Fastpitch- windmill, orthodox, slingshot, and whip- this video will be demonstrating how to windmill pitch.

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How to Pitch Fastpitch Softball
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This video will demonstrate the basic fundamentals of how to pitch Fastpitch Softball.

This video will demonstrate the basic fundamentals of how to pitch Fastpitch Softball.

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This is called the 'C' of the ball, or the horseshoe. These seams are used in a pitchers primary grip of the ball.

This is called the 'C' of the ball, or the horseshoe. These seams are used in a pitchers primary grip of the ball.

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The fingertips are placed across the seams of the 'C', with your thumb around the back of the ball. Your thumb should be in line with  your middle or index finger on the opposite side of the ball.

The fingertips are placed across the seams of the 'C', with your thumb around the back of the ball. Your thumb should be in line with your middle or index finger on the opposite side of the ball.

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Both feet must be in contact with the pitching rubber. You want to find a comfortable balanced position. For most people, this is achieved by placing the feet shoulder width apart and staggered.

Both feet must be in contact with the pitching rubber. You want to find a comfortable balanced position. For most people, this is achieved by placing the feet shoulder width apart and staggered.

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The foot on the side you throw with should be forward, the other back. A staggered stance is used for optimal weight distribution, & to develop the drive and power needed from a pitchers lower body.

The foot on the side you throw with should be forward, the other back. A staggered stance is used for optimal weight distribution, & to develop the drive and power needed from a pitchers lower body.

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Pay attention to the shifting of the pitchers weight from back foot to front foot. The motion of the arms in this part of a pitch is simply to get the pitcher's momentum started and styles will vary.

Pay attention to the shifting of the pitchers weight from back foot to front foot. The motion of the arms in this part of a pitch is simply to get the pitcher's momentum started and styles will vary.

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This is another style of windup that a pitcher may use. Something to note here is that a pitcher is only allowed one full rotation of their arm, prior to delivery.

This is another style of windup that a pitcher may use. Something to note here is that a pitcher is only allowed one full rotation of their arm, prior to delivery.

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This is another example where the pitcher may choose not to swing their arms during their weight transfer. It is entirely up to the pitcher to decide what is the most comfortable windup for them.

This is another example where the pitcher may choose not to swing their arms during their weight transfer. It is entirely up to the pitcher to decide what is the most comfortable windup for them.

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This clip shows how a pitcher will utilize their drive leg (front foot on the rubber) to push into their open position with force to drive their body into the pitch. Only one forward step is allowed.

This clip shows how a pitcher will utilize their drive leg (front foot on the rubber) to push into their open position with force to drive their body into the pitch. Only one forward step is allowed.

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This demonstrates how a pitcher gets from their start position (closed position) to what is called 'open position'.

This demonstrates how a pitcher gets from their start position (closed position) to what is called 'open position'.

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This open position, occurring in the middle of the pitch, allows you to drive with your push leg, and creates a clear path for the arm to pass by without interference from the hip.

This open position, occurring in the middle of the pitch, allows you to drive with your push leg, and creates a clear path for the arm to pass by without interference from the hip.

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This shows the path of the arm and push off the rubber from closed position, to open position, and back to closed position to finish the motion.

This shows the path of the arm and push off the rubber from closed position, to open position, and back to closed position to finish the motion.

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On the downswing the elbow is slightly bent, then reaches full extension at its lowest point. The ball is released with a snap of the wrist. The elbow then bends up as the arm follows through.

On the downswing the elbow is slightly bent, then reaches full extension at its lowest point. The ball is released with a snap of the wrist. The elbow then bends up as the arm follows through.

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This shows the how to correctly place fingertip pressure on the seams and create space between the palm and the ball when the ball is at release point.

This shows the how to correctly place fingertip pressure on the seams and create space between the palm and the ball when the ball is at release point.

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This video shows how, in a game situation, a pitcher would begin closed, get open, and then get into closed position again, ready to defend a ball hit back at them.

This video shows how, in a game situation, a pitcher would begin closed, get open, and then get into closed position again, ready to defend a ball hit back at them.

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View of a pitch from behind.

View of a pitch from behind.

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View of pitch from a batters position.

View of pitch from a batters position.

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Full pitch with no arm swing in windup. Alternative windup to the arm swing.

Full pitch with no arm swing in windup. Alternative windup to the arm swing.

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This is a drill used to perfect the open position in the middle of your motion. This helps to let the arm travel in one smooth, uninterrupted path until the ball is released and the body closes again.

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This is the position you want to be in for this drill. It replicates the feeling of being in open position, but restricts the body from closing at all because the legs remain stationary.

This is the position you want to be in for this drill. It replicates the feeling of being in open position, but restricts the body from closing at all because the legs remain stationary.

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This is how close your arm should be to your body when passing by your thigh to release. The point of this drill is to learn to move the arm in a straight path. Your arm should brush your body.

This is how close your arm should be to your body when passing by your thigh to release. The point of this drill is to learn to move the arm in a straight path. Your arm should brush your body.

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This is how it should look. The arm path is uninterrupted.

This is how it should look. The arm path is uninterrupted.

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Once you've mastered the last drill, why not kick it up a notch?!  Move to a regular, standing open position and see how it feels to incorporate the legs in it.

Once you've mastered the last drill, why not kick it up a notch?! Move to a regular, standing open position and see how it feels to incorporate the legs in it.

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This is where your ball should be released. Your arm needs to stay close to your body, it's crucial to achieving your best pitch.

This is where your ball should be released. Your arm needs to stay close to your body, it's crucial to achieving your best pitch.

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In this level of the drill, you can now push with your legs. See how it feels to come up on that front leg and hold that position without closing the hips so you know you have remained open.

In this level of the drill, you can now push with your legs. See how it feels to come up on that front leg and hold that position without closing the hips so you know you have remained open.

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Extra Information!

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This is how you grip a rise ball. You really want to dig your pointer finger into the seam. For this grip, your finger tips should rest on the arch of the horseshoe.

This is how you grip a rise ball. You really want to dig your pointer finger into the seam. For this grip, your finger tips should rest on the arch of the horseshoe.

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To get this pitch to rise, you need to turn your forearm and wrist like you would to open a door. Still release the ball at the thigh as shown before.

To get this pitch to rise, you need to turn your forearm and wrist like you would to open a door. Still release the ball at the thigh as shown before.

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This is one of the many grips for throwing a change up. This is called a "circle change". You should be cupping the ball in the palm of your hand. No pressure should be applied from the fingertips.

This is one of the many grips for throwing a change up. This is called a "circle change". You should be cupping the ball in the palm of your hand. No pressure should be applied from the fingertips.

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You don't want to snap your wrist in any way. You just want to release the ball by opening your hand. In a real situation, your body will move at the same speed as normal, the ball will move slow.

You don't want to snap your wrist in any way. You just want to release the ball by opening your hand. In a real situation, your body will move at the same speed as normal, the ball will move slow.

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This is a regular grip, and also a grip used to throw a drop ball. This grip was covered previously.

This is a regular grip, and also a grip used to throw a drop ball. This grip was covered previously.

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The arm comes through as normal, with a special emphasis on the wrist and elbow snapping straight up. This makes the ball to spin perfectly up and down, and causes the ball to drop.

The arm comes through as normal, with a special emphasis on the wrist and elbow snapping straight up. This makes the ball to spin perfectly up and down, and causes the ball to drop.

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The end !

The end !

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